North Korean Propaganda and the Korean Conflict

The North Korean government released a new propaganda video this week. The video, complete with amateurish graphics, threatens the United States with devastation, noting that “The White House has been captured in the view of our long-range missile, and the capital of war is within the range of our atomic bomb.”

The video echoes the trailer for the 2012 remake of the Cold War classic Red Dawn. The 2012 remake positions North Korea as the invading force occupying the Pacific Northwest. (In an interesting aside, the studio spent more than a million dollars in post-production to change the enemy forces after the film had been shot. Originally, the invading army was supposed to be Chinese, but they were recast as North Koreans in an effort to expand box office earnings in China).

But while the parallels between the two are humorous, the increasing bellicosity from the North Korean regime is causing concern among Korea-watchers. The North Korean government last week announced it was invalidating the armistice that ended direct hostilities in the Korean War in 1953. It has also stepped up nuclear testing  and long range missile testing in recent months. Meanwhile, the United States is expanding operations on the Korean peninsula, engaging in joint training operations with the South Korean military this week.

North Korean belligerence seems to come in regular cycles. But the current cycle appears to be more intense that others, leading some spectators to question whether the current leader, Kim Jong Un, is more dangerous and less predictable than his father, Kim Jong Il, and grandfather, Kim Il Sung, both of whom led the country previously. Interestingly, North Korea’s closest ally, china, appears to be growing increasingly frustrated with the regime, and has supported expanding sanctions on North Korea in recent months.

What do you think? Does North Korea pose a threat to the United States and South Korea? If so, what measures should be taken to address the North Korean threat. Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

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One response to “North Korean Propaganda and the Korean Conflict

  1. Certainly North Korea is trying to give the impression of a powerful and influential country. Although, if we consider the facts that Korea is not developed as South Korea and the USA (obviously). People still die from famine; political fear has become normal in North Korea; and underdeveloped infrastructure (the list can go on and on). Just because they invest large amount of money in to their military and arms, does not mean they pose a serious threat to some seriously powerful countries.
    They are not a serious threat to the USA, but they possess a threat to South Korea (being a neighbour country and etc.). But even if Kim Jong Un decides to take some drastic measures, the only predictable outcome is going to be, that North Korea will not comprehend the financial expenditure on military actions. So there is no point for them (at least at this stage), to do anything.

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