Tag Archives: Morgan Tsvangirai

Five Stories You Might Have Missed

Poor economic news continues to flow out of most of the world. In the United States, new jobless figures released last week show unemployment up to 8.1 percent, the highest rate in 25 years. Malaysian exports have collapsed, placing pressure on the government to find a solution to the ongoing crisis. And the banking sector in South Africa, Canada, and Mexico (among others) continues to face problems, and the International Monetary Fund is urging greater coordination to address the crisis. 

But the Chinese government is asserting that things are improving there already, forecasting 8 percent growth this year and denying the economy is in a downturn. If they’re correct, perhaps we’re starting to see the beginning of the end of the global economic crisis. I, however, remain cautious.

Here’s important five stories from the previous week:

1. Hillary Clinton continued her charm offensive in Europe last week. After shifting to a more diplomatic strategy with Syria, the new Obama administration has announced its intention to conclude a new arms control agreement with Russia by the end of the year. The effort to improve diplomatic relations with both Syria and Russia are seen as part of a wider effort by the Obama administration to distance itself from the hardline policies of the previous president.

2. A suicide bomb attack against Baghdad’s main police academy killed 28 people on Sunday. Although the number of attacks has declined since the height of the sectarian violence in 2003, the attack nevertheless illustrates the challenges that Iraq continues to face.  On Thursday, a car bomb attack in Babil province—a region that has enjoyed relative peace for months—killed 12 people and injured 40. 

3.  Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad on Saturday announced his intention to resign. Fayyad was appointed by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas after Hamas took control of Gaza in 2007. But Fayyad was a controversial figure, and Hamas regularly criticized Fayyad for being too closely aligned with the United States and Israel. Fayyad’s resignation is seen as an important step towards the development of a unity government for Palestine, which itself is viewed as an important first step in the Middle East peace process.

4. The Good Friday peace accord in Northern Ireland faces its most serious challenge since it was signed in 1998, after two British soldiers were killed Saturday night in an attack by Irish nationalist groups opposed to the agreement. Though no group has yet claimed responsibility, several groups, including the Real IRA, the Continuity IRA, and the Irish National Liberation Army, oppose Sinn Fein’s effort to develop a powersharing agreement and peace deal for Northern Ireland.

5. Last week, President Hugo Chávez stepped up his effort to nationalize foreign agricultural producers in Venezuela. After last month’s referendum, which granted Chávez the right to remain in office indefinitely, Chávez announced his intention to move forward with the nationalization of key industries, including oil, steel, and cement. Chávez accuses foreign agricultural producers of exacerbating the country’s economic problems.

And in a bonus story for this week:

6. Zimbabwe’s Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai was injured in a car accident on Saturday, and Susan Tsvangirai, his wife of 31 years, was killed. According to witnesses, a truck swerved from the oncoming lane and struck his car, the middle in a convoy of three cars, head on. Some within Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change have accused Zimbabwe’s President, Robert Mugabe, of masterminding the attack in an effort to eliminate his political rival. Although Tsvangirai has since said he did not believe the accident was part of a broader plot by Mugabe to eliminate him, Tsvangirai did accept an offer from Botswana’s President to recouperate across the border, fueling speculation about the nature of the accident. Zimbabwe’s national unity government remains an unstable coalition of rival groups, and the government has been unable to effectively address the ongoing economic crisis there.

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Five Stories You Might Have Missed

The meeting of the Group of Seven, or G7, took place in Rome on Saturday.  And while anti-poverty campaigners appealed for the group to address the problem of increasing global inequality and rising poverty, the primary focus of the annual meeting was the global economic crisis.  Following the dispute over the inclusion (and subsequent removal) of buy-American provisions in the U.S. economic stimulus package, the G7 felt the need to include a commitment to use “the full range of policy tools” to address the global downturn while simultaneously renewing commitments to avoid protectionist measures.  This amid news that the Eurozone has now entered its worst slump in fifty years, with the Eurozone GDP falling 1.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2008, and the German GDP falling by 2.1 percent of the same period.  Amid the poor economic news, the European Central Bank is expected to cut its prime interest rate to 1.5 percent, its lowest rate ever.  The U.S. Federal Reserve’s federal funds rate has already been effectively reduced to 0 percent.

In other news from the previous week:

1.  A U.S. missile strike in the South Waziristan region of Pakistan (along the Afghan border) on Saturday killed at least 25 al Qaeda-linked militants.  The drone-launched missile was the third such strike since President Obama took office.  The Pakistani government has been undercut the influence of militants in the region, believed to be a bastion for al Qaeda.   But the continued strikes by the U.S. also threaten to undermine the legitimacy of the Pakistani government.

2. Israel announced it would not agree to a ceasefire with Hamas unless an Israeli soldier held since he was kidnapped in a cross-border raid in 2006.  The Israeli position appears to complicate efforts to reach a permanent ceasefire.  A series of rocket attacks and retaliatory strikes (or strikes and retaliatory rocket attacks, depending on whose press you read), has made establishing a lasting ceasefire between the combatants more difficult.  Further complicating the situation were Israeli elections held last week.  The elections handed Tzipi Livni’s centrist Kadmina party a narrow one-seat victory over the rival center-right Likud party under Benjamin Netanyahu.  The close victory has left both parties scrambling to line up potential coalition partners, leaving the final outcome of the election uncertain.

3.  The outlook for the ongoing crisis in Zimbabwe appeared to brighten a bit last week, as a unity government took office.  Under the terms of the agreement, Robert Mugabe will remain President of Zimbabwe.  His political rival, Morgan Tsvangirai, will become the country’s prime minister.  The government of national unity appears to have—at least temporarily—brought to a close the country’s ongoing political crisis.  But how long this remains the case is unclear.  By Friday, the arrest of Roy Bennett, Tsvangarai’s nominee for deputy agriculture minister, on charges of treason raised questions about the degree to which the new government represents a real break with the past.    Further, the heavy lifting of addressing a national cholera outbreak and brining the country’s economy back from total collapse remains on the to-do list. 

4. The situation in Afghanistan appears to be deteriorating.   A series of bombings and well-coordinated attacks by gunmen over the last several days has left dozens of people dead.  While such attacks had become increasingly common in the Taliban-dominated areas along the Pakistani border, the most recent attacks occurred in what had historically been viewed as the safest region of the country—its capital, Kabul.  Analysts view the attacks as an indication of the increasing support and sophistication of Taliban-backed forces.  The attacks come amidst indications that the Obama administration is considering a request to increase by 30,000 the number of troops deployed to Afghanistan.

5. Disputes between European Union member states over the structure and nature of efforts to address the global economic crisis have led to tension within the Union.  On Tuesday, the Czech Republic’s prime minister (and current president of the European Union) accused the member state governments of engaging in policies that threaten to “deform” the Eurozone.  On Wednesday, in an indication of how serious the dispute is, the European Union scheduled two emergency summits to address the crisis, suppress protectionism, sustain employment, and prevent the bloc’s political fragmentation into old and new member states.